Stark Nakeeed

My name's Lara. 20 yrs old. I like animals, science, Avengers and lots of other things too! Check out some of my tags for specific stuff, if you don't wanna go searching through it all. I <3 all my followers. Currently on season 3 of Supernatural.

  1. Nature & Science

  1. RDJ

  1. Avengers/Marvel

  1. StevexTony

  1. Art

  1. deviantArt

atlasobscura:

Essential Guide: The Lost Cities Edition

Hidden in the depths of the sea, buried under hillsides, swallowed up by the jungle, or consumed by the wrath of the heavens – lost cities have fascinated, ever since Plato told the story of Atlantis:

Now in this island of Atlantis there was a great and wonderful empire which had rule over the whole island and several others. […] But afterwards there occurred violent earthquakes and floods; and in a single day and night of misfortune all the warlike men in a body sank into the earth, and the island of Atlantis in like manner disappeared in the depths of the sea.

Many people have gone in search of lost cities — believing in tall tales and ancient legends. Con-men, archaeologists, showmen, and adventurers have traveled over the mountains of Afghanistan, through the jungles of Cambodia, across the deserts of Jordan, and into the very strangest parts of the world, full of hope. But as many have discovered, finding a lost city can be the easy part — what happens next is when things get interesting… 

Atlas Obscura Presents Our Essential Guide to Lost Cities

(via cosmo-nautic)

vurtual:

Detached Sea Cave Wonderland - Taiwan ( by wrc213)

(via kiteworth)

n-a-s-a:

Perseid Meteor Shower at Snowy Range
Credit: David Kingham

n-a-s-a:

Perseid Meteor Shower at Snowy Range

Credit: David Kingham

snake-lovers:

Giant spitting cobra (Naja ashei)

snake-lovers:

Giant spitting cobra (Naja ashei)

(via thepredatorblog)

Wow.

Wow.

(Source: babychipmunk, via lilaira)

touchdisky:

Attack !!! by Jkboy Jatenipat

touchdisky:

Attack !!! by Jkboy Jatenipat

(via vurtual)

smithsonianmag:

Smithsonian Scientists Discover New Species of Mammal

By Joseph Stromberg

Photos © Mark Gurney

For all of modern history, a small, carnivorous South American mammal in the raccoon family has evaded the scientific community. Untold thousands of these red, furry creatures scampered through the trees of the Andean cloud forests, but they did so at night, hidden by dense fog. Nearly two dozen preserved samples—mostly skulls or furs— were mislabeled in museum collections across the United States. There’s even evidence that one individual lived in several American zoos during the 1960s—its keepers were mystified as to why it refused to breed with its peers.

Now, the discovery of the olinguito has solved the mystery. At an announcement today in Washington, D.C., Kristofer Helgen, curator of mammals at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, presented anatomical and DNA evidence that establish the olinguito (pronounced oh-lin-GHEE-toe) as a living species distinct from other known olingos, carnivorous tree-dwelling mammals native to Central and South America. His team’s work, also published today in the journal ZooKeys, represents the first discovery of a new carnivorous mammal species in the American continents in more than three decades.

Read the full story at Smithsonian.com.

(Source: smithsonianmag.com, via hootbird)

pseudomuse:

If Earth Had Rings

First off, they would be really pretty to look at. They would also dominate the sky in both night and day at exactly the same place as they would never rise nor set. And at night you would see the Earth’s shadow swing across the rings, like in the 4th photo here.

However, life would be very different on Earth if this were the case. Nocturnal animals would have a hard time being nocturnal, as the light reflecting from the rings would illuminate the night.

Because we are closer to the Sun than Saturn is, the rings would be more rocky than ice, making them less bright but still pretty bright. In fact, you would see far less stars at night (living anywhere other than the equator or the arctic circle) because of the light pollution and not to mention ruin most meteor showers because of that.

During the day the rings would block sunlight in certain regions of the planet creating wild weather cycles and effecting plant life as well. So basically, they would be definitely pretty to look at but they would also make a whole lot of things screwy.

Illustrations by Ron Miller // io9
— Click the photos for captions

So yeah, this is what I imagine the ring of siberys to be like in Eberron, except a bit more chaotically spaced, not so luminescent, and a variety of gold color shades.

yesysabella:

vagosphere:

And their names are texas tornado and johnny football.

WHAT THE FUCK ARE THESE FLUFFY ASS COWS!

(Source: weeaboo-chan, via uncle-jim)

smoteymote:

steppen-wolf:

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that. Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls. 

I have a lot of feels about ravens and wolves.

smoteymote:

steppen-wolf:

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that. Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.

There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.

Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.

Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls. 

I have a lot of feels about ravens and wolves.

(via lilaira)